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Depression and Hearing link, Bristol

Depression and Hearing link, Bristol

 

Depression and Hearing link, Bristol. Stephen Neal audiologist who is based at the Keynsham hearing centre knows that Depression and hearing can be linked.

Depression and hearing link found by researchers.

New report into depression and hearing has been published. We at the Keynsham hearing centre are well aware of this link and can help with making your hearing a little better.

Bristol hearing and Ear wax removal centre

 

Bristol hearing and Ear wax removal centre is at the Keynsham hearing centre the independent hearing and ear wax specialist covering Bath, Bristol, & Somerset.  If you are having issues with hearing in general we can conduct a hearing test at Keynsham. The comprehensive hearing test will take around an hour of your time, but the results will be know there and then putting you in control of your hearing. We can then discuss what hearing instrument (hearing aid) you may need if required.  There could be other issues at play if you are not hearing as well as you think you should be. We can before the test look to see if you have any ear wax present. Ear wax isn’t usually an issue, we all need a little for good ear health. However in some cases excessive ear wax build up can become an issue and if you have excessive ear wax we will clear this before any test is conducted.

Depression and Hearing link, Bristol

Ear wax removal is very easy and painless. We use the Microsuction ear wax removal method as this really is the gold standard of ear wax removal. We also can use the older method of ear wax removal called irrigation or some may know this as ear syringing. This method uses warm water to gently irrigate the ear to help release the ear wax out from the ear.

You can watch our ear wax removal here

 

So if you are having some hearing issues and would like afamily run professional ear wax removal service then book an appointment. We can discuss at the appointment any of the issues at length. After all we are all ears!

 

Ear wax removal Bath and Bristol

 

Stephen Neal News:

Bringing world wide news on hearing to our local area.

 

Study Shows Older Adults with Hearing Loss at Higher Risk for Depression

 

Hearing loss is linked to depression

Keynsham hearing centre

The results of a study investigating the connection between hearing loss and depression found that older adults with some form of hearing loss were 47% more likely to also have depression symptoms, according to an article in Reuters

Bristol Hearing centre

Originally published in The Gerontologist, the research reviewlooked at 35 previous studies encompassing 147, 148 participants, who were at least 60 years old.

“We know that older adults with hearing loss often withdraw from social occasions, like family events because they have trouble understanding others in noisy situations, which can lead to emotional and social loneliness,” lead study author Blake Lawrence of the Ear Science Institute Australia, in Subiaco, and the University of Western Australia in Crawley, was quoted as saying in Reuters. 

Additionally, the article goes on to add that the brain may work harder to interpret sound from a weaker auditory signal, draining resources needed to maintain working memory or other cognitive functions. A weaker signal may also cause the “reorganization” of neural pathways, potentially changing the way depression is regulated in the brain.

Ear syringing Bath

In a new white paper produced by The Hearing Review and sponsored by Hamilton CapTel, “Depression, Hearing Loss, and Treatment with Hearing Aids,” audiologist and educator Victor Bray, PhD, reviews previous landmark studies as well as more recent research into the complex relationship between hearing loss and depression. The paper helps identify patient populations who might benefit most from hearing devices. Additionally, Dr Bray’s webinar “Depression, Hearing Loss, and Treatment with Hearing Aids,” discusses the risk factors for depression among people with hearing loss as well as why hearing care providers should screen for depression when risk factors are present.

Original Paper: Lawrence BJ, Jayakody DMP, Bennett RJ, Eikelboom RH, Gasson N, Friedland PL. Hearing loss and depression in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysisThe Gerontologist. 2019:1-19. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnz009

Source: Reuters, The Hearing Review, The Gerontologist

Bristol ear wax removal

Bristol ear wax removal

 

Bristol ear wax removal is available at the Keynsham hearing centre. If you are in urgent need for ear wax removal we do offer a premium out of hours appointments usually the same day, but please call reception for more details and availability. Appointments are available on a first come first served basis.

Ear wax removal Bristol

You can watch here how we conduct ear wax removal using the Microsuction technique here.

Stephen Neal also dispenses and sells hearing aids to the general public. The very latest digital hearing aids are available, all 12 hearing aid companies deal with Stephen so you know you are in good hands for choice.

 

Stephen Neal news:

EVENTS

BIHIMA Round Table Event Focused on Connection Between Hearing Loss and Dementia

Published on 

BIHIMA_LOGO_RGB_150dpi

A cross-sector summit was held last month, bringing together experts to discuss the connection between hearing loss as a risk factor in developing dementia, as well as highlighting the preventative role of hearing technology. The round table event was convened by the British and Irish Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association (BIHIMA) on February 28, 2019 at the Royal College of General Practitioners in London, BIHIMA announced.

A series of podcasts of the event’s discussion has been created in order to spread greater understanding, available for download here.

Bristol ear wax removal

The event united audiologists, research scientists, and representatives from the media and charity sectors, to share knowledge and develop strategies to get the crucial message out into the public arena, so the proven link between the two conditions is taken seriously by individuals and policymakers.

There is growing evidence of the connection between the two conditions, including a Lancet study which showed that midlife hearing loss may account for up to 9.1% of preventable dementia cases worldwide and is a modifiable risk factor in developing the condition1. Dr Sergi Costafreda Gonzalez, co-author of the study, attended the Round Table.

There is less research, however, into the mitigating benefits of hearing aids. A University of Manchester study2 showed the rate of age-related cognitive decline is 75% less following the adoption of hearing devices. Co-author of this study, Dr Asri Maharani, shared details of these findings on the day. Further studies are now underway but this remains an undeveloped area, and so last month’s forum called publicly for further trials.

The panel also called on policymakers to make this area a funding priority. As new data emerges which proves the impact of hearing aids in preventing dementia, this will provide greater economic argument for making hearing technology more available to those at risk of cognitive decline.

Ear wax removal Bristol

“The better we understand cognitive decline and why hearing aid use helps, the better we can design intervention,” said Dr Helene Amieva, author of the 25-year study, “Death, Depression, Disability, and Dementia Associated with Self-reported Hearing Problems.”3

The panel also strongly recommended a cross-sector approach, whereby hearing loss is understood as part of a wider discussion which links with both neuroscience and social issues around isolation and wellbeing in the aging population.

“Dementia is a condition which affects 47 million people globally and is fast becoming a social care crisis. There is no time to waste in understanding the role of hearing technology which could stem the tide of the disease, and in educating people about looking after both their hearing and cognitive health,” said the BIHIMA Chairman, Paul Surridge.

BIHIMA PANEL ATTENDEES:

Paul Surridge, BIHIMA Chairman

Helene Amieva, PhD, author of: “Death, Depression, Disability, and Dementia Associated with Self-reported Hearing Problems: A 25-Year Study,” Inserm, University of Bordeaux

Dr Sergi Costafreda Gonzalez, co-author of the study: “Dementia prevention, intervention and care,” The Lancet, University College London

Ear wax removal Bristol

Tony Gunnell, audiologist (BIHIMA representative)

Peter Kunzmann, head of research and policy, Action on Hearing Loss

Brian Lamb, associate of The Ear Foundation and chair of the Hearing Loss and Deafness Alliance and the Action Group on Adult Cochlear Implantation

Dr Asri Maharani, co-author of the study: ‘Longitudinal Relationship Between Hearing Aid Use and Cognitive Function in Older Americans’, University of Manchester

Source: BIHIMA, The Lancet, Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, The Journals of Gerontology

References

  1. Livingston G, Sommerlad A, Orgeta V, et al. Dementia prevention, intervention, and care. The Lancet. 2017;390(10113):P2673-2734.

  1. Maharani A, Dawes P, Nazroo J, Tampubolon G, Pendleton N. Longitudinal relationship between hearing aid use and cognitive function in older Americans. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2018;66(6):1130-1136.

  1. Amieva H, Ouvrard C, Meillon C, Rullier L, Dartigues J-F. Death, depression, disability, and dementia associated with self-reported hearing problems: A 25-year study. The Journals of Gerontology. 2018;73(10):1383-1389.

 

Ear wax removal Radstock

Ear wax removal Radstock

Ear wax removal for Radstock is available at the Keynsham hearing centre between Bath and Bristol. Run by Stephen Neal the Keynsham centre covers the whole of Somerset and Wiltshire.  If you are suffering from ear wax issues or in need of a hearing test please book your appointment with Anita at reception.

Out of hours appointments are available at a premium price, there are very limited spaces, pleas call Anita on reception to organise an out of hours ear wax appointment.

To find out more about ear wax removal using the Microsuction technique please click here.

Ear wax removal Radstock

 

Stephen Neal ear wax removal news:

Researchers Restore Hearing via Gene Therapy in Deaf Mouse Model

Published on 

In collaboration with the universities of MiamiColumbia, and San Francisco, scientists from the Institut Pasteur, InsermCNRSCollège de FranceSorbonne University, and the University of Clermont Auvergne have managed to restore hearing in an adult mouse model of DFNB9 deafness, a hearing disorder that represents one of the most frequent cases of congenital genetic deafness, Institut Pasteur announced on its website. Individuals with DFNB9 deafness are profoundly deaf as they are deficient in the gene coding for otoferlin, a protein which is essential for transmitting sound information at the auditory sensory cell synapses. By carrying out an intracochlear injection of this gene in an adult DFNB9 mouse model, the scientists successfully restored auditory synapse function and hearing thresholds to a near-normal level. These findings, published in the journal PNAS, open up new avenues for future gene therapy trials in patients with DFNB9.

The left panel is a schematic representation of the human ear. Sound waves are collected by the outer ear made up of the pinna and ear canal. The middle ear, composed of the eardrum and ossicles, transmits sound waves to the inner ear, which features the cochlea – the hearing organ responsible for transmitting auditory messages to the central nervous system. The right panel shows an immunofluorescence image of the auditory sensory epithelium within an injected cochlea. The inner hair cells have been stained for otoferlin in green. Otoferlin is detected in almost all of these cells. The inset is a high magnification area showing an inner hair cell that has not been transduced. © Institut Pasteur

The left panel is a schematic representation of the human ear. Sound waves are collected by the outer ear made up of the pinna and ear canal. The middle ear, composed of the eardrum and ossicles, transmits sound waves to the inner ear, which features the cochlea – the hearing organ responsible for transmitting auditory messages to the central nervous system. The right panel shows an immunofluorescence image of the auditory sensory epithelium within an injected cochlea. The inner hair cells have been stained for otoferlin in green. Otoferlin is detected in almost all of these cells. The inset is a high magnification area showing an inner hair cell that has not been transduced. © Institut Pasteur

Over half of nonsyndromic profound congenital deafness cases have a genetic cause, and most (~80%) of these cases are due to autosomal recessive forms of deafness (DFNB). Cochlear implants are currently the only option for recovering hearing in these patients.

Ear wax removal Radstock

Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are among the most promising vectors for therapeutic gene transfer to treat human diseases. AAV-based gene therapy is a promising therapeutic option for treating deafness but its application is limited by a potentially narrow therapeutic window. In humans, inner ear development is completed in utero and hearing becomes possible at approximately 20 weeks of gestation. In addition, genetic forms of congenital deafness are generally diagnosed during the neonatal period. Gene therapy approaches in animal models must therefore take this into account, and gene therapy efficacy must be demonstrated following a gene injection when the auditory system is already in place. In other words, therapy must reverse existing deafness. The team led by Saaïd Safieddine, a CNRS researcher in the Genetics and Physiology of Hearing Unit (Institut Pasteur/ Inserm) and coordinator of the project, used a mouse model of DFNB9, a form of human deafness that represents 2-8% of all cases of congenital genetic deafness.

Ear wax removal Radstock

DFNB9 deafness is caused by mutations in the gene coding for otoferlin, a protein that plays a key role in transmitting sound information at the inner hair cell synapses. Mutant mice deficient in otoferlin are profoundly deaf as these synapses fail to release neurotransmitters in response to sound stimulation, despite the absence of detectable sensory epithelial defects. DFNB9 mice therefore constitute an appropriate model for testing the efficacy of viral gene therapy when it is administered at a late stage. However, as AAVs have limited DNA packaging capacity (approximately 4.7 kilobase (kb)), it is difficult to use this technique for genes whose coding region (cDNA) exceeds 5 kb, such as the gene coding for otoferlin, which has a 6 kb coding region. The scientists have overcome this limitation by adapting an AAV approach known as dual AAV strategy because it uses two different recombinant vectors, one containing the 5’-end and the other the 3’-end of the otoferlin cDNA.

A single intracochlear injection of the vector pair in adult mutant mice was used to reconstruct the otoferlin coding region by recombining 5′ and 3′-end DNA segments, leading to long-term restoration of otoferlin expression in the inner hair cells, and then restored hearing.

The scientists have therefore obtained initial proof of the concept of viral transfer of fragmented cDNA in the cochlea using two vectors, showing that this approach can be used to produce otoferlin and durably correct the profound deafness phenotype in mice.

The outcomes achieved by the scientists suggest that the therapeutic window for local gene transfer in patients with DFNB9 congenital deafness could be wider than thought, and offers hope of extending these findings to other forms of deafness. These results are the subject of a patent application filed.

In addition to the institutions mentioned in the first paragraph, this research was funded by the French Foundation for Medical Research, the European Union (TREAT RUSH), and the French National Research Agency (EargenCure and Lifesenses LabEx).

Original Paper: Akil O, Dyka F, Calvet C, et al. Dual AAV-mediated gene therapy restores hearing in a DFNB9 mouse model. PNAS. 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1817537116

Source: Institut Pasteur, PNAS

Image: Institute Pasteur

Ear wax removal Radstock

Wells Somerset, ear wax removal

Wells Somerset, ear wax removal

Stephen Neal is the Wells in Somerset premier ear wax removal specialist.  Covering Wells in Somerset, as well as Cheddar, Wookey Hole, Glastonbury, Shepton Mallet, Westbury-sub-Mendip and Street.

Stephen makes a visit to the audiologist a breeze. He is very easy going chap as you can see here on the Microsuction ear wax removal video. 

Stephen Neal is based at the Keynsham Hearing centre, here he can conduct hearing tests, dispense hearing aids and give advice on all aspects of hearing issues.

 

Stephen Neal News:

Widex Announces New Insights into EVOKE Hearing Aid’s AI Function

 

Wells Somerset, hearing tests Wells, Ear wax removal Wells,

Wells hearing centre, Wells ear wax centre, Wells hearing test

Widex announced the first data gathered from the WIDEX EVOKE™ hearing aid, which is said to achieve “a new level of Artificial Intelligence (AI)” through machine learning, and is helping to bring new insights into how users are taking control of their sound environment to improve their hearing experience, according to the company.

Denmark-based Widex launched the WIDEX EVOKE hearing aid in April. The hearing aid is reportedly the first to give users the ability to employ real-time machine learning that can solve the tricky hearing problems that users face in their daily lives.

“We launched WIDEX EVOKE with SoundSense technology to put users back in control of the most difficult hearing situations,” said Jens Brehm Nielsen, data science & machine learning architect at Widex. “And we can see that EVOKE users have taken the opportunity to do that and, in the process, are helping us understand more about them. That information will help us to make the EVOKE and future hearing aids even better.”

Ear wax removal, Wells, Somerset

SoundSense Learn is an AI system, because AI is said to refer to systems that solve tasks humans are inherently good at—such as driving a car, doing the dishes, etc. SoundSense Learn expands into entirely new applications by helping end users adjust their hearing aids in the moment, reportedly something that no humans can replicate to the same degree of accuracy, according to Widex.

The SoundSense Learn smartphone app is connected to the EVOKE hearing aids and uses machine learning to guide users in optimizing the settings to their exact needs. The app gathers a variety of anonymous data such as how often they turn the volume up or down, which sound presets they use, and how many custom settings they create—including those made with SoundSense Learn.

Hearing centre, Wells Somerset

Tagging of custom settings has proved to be one of the interesting pieces of data generated by EVOKE.

“We found that many people have created a setting and tagged it with, for instance, ‘work’ which suggests that it is something that our end users need and want,” said Nielsen. “And from SoundSense Learn we already have an idea of how they like the settings.”

Some hearing aids give users the ability to customize their sound experience by adjusting frequency bands to boost or cut bass, middle or high tones. Adjusting frequencies works well in many situations once the initial settings have been set by a skilled audiologist. However, some situations are so complex that hitting the right combination of adjustments can be difficult.

“Widex hearing aids are well known for the quality of their sound,” said Nielsen. “But SoundSense Learn has added an extra layer of quality sound on top of that by using a machine learning algorithm together with reinforcement learning—the two key ingredients in state-of-the art AI algorithm, that enables the algorithm to learn in the moment.

“The algorithm learns an optimal setting every time a user finds the sound to be a little below expectations in a given sound environment. It learns these settings by simply asking the user to compare two settings that are carefully picked by the algorithm. This allows it to learn an optimal setting in a new environment very fast.”

By collating and analyzing the anonymous data WIDEX EVOKE will continue to become even smarter as time passes.

Source: Widex

Image: Widex

 

 

Ear wax removal Wells Somerset

Ear wax removal Wells Somerset, By Stephen Neal

 

Ear wax can be a troublesome thing if you suffer from excess ear wax. Stephen Neal, the ear wax specialist for Wells, Somerset, can relive you of your ear wax without pain or worry. Using the Microsuction technique Stephen will clear your ear wax easily and painlessly.  Based at the Keynsham hearing centre, Stephen can also conduct hearing tests, dispense the very latest digital hearing aids and has a fully stocked hearing aid battery supply.

 

Stephen Neal, ear wax removal News:

 

Starkey Launches Livio AI Hearing Aid with Integrated Sensors and Artificial Intelligence

Starkey Livio AI.

Somerset, ear wax removal, Hearing aids in Somerset,

Wells Somerset ear wax removal,

Starkey® Hearing Technologies is said to have “reinvented both the hearing experience and the hearing aid” with Livio AI. Livio AI is reportedly “the world’s first” Healthable™ hearing aid to utilize integrated sensors and artificial intelligence and the first device to track physical activity and cognitive health as measured by hearing aid use in social situations, Starkey announced.

The launch also includes a brand-new mobile app—Thrive™ Hearing—and three new wireless accessories, the Starkey Hearing Technologies TV, the Remote, and the Remote Microphone +. With the Remote Micorophone+, Livio AI is also the first hearing aid to feature Amazon® Alexa connectivity.

“First and foremost, Livio AI is the best performing and best sounding hearing aid we have ever made,” said Starkey Hearing Technologies President Brandon Sawalich. “What makes today a pivotal moment in the hearing industry, is that with Livio AI, we have transformed a single-use device into the world’s first multi-purpose hearing aid, a Healthable with integrated sensors and artificial intelligence. Livio AI is so much more than just a hearing aid, it is a gateway to better health and wellness.”

Ear wax removal in the Somerset area including Wells

 

According to Starkey, the new Hearing Reality™ technology is said to provide an average 50% reduction in noisy environments, significant reduced listening effort, and newly enhanced clarity of speech, while the use of artificial intelligence and integrated sensors enables it to help optimize the hearing experience.

Artificial intelligence and advancements in hearing technology enabled Livio AI to provide the following unique features and benefits, according to Starkey’s announcement:

  • Understand and see the real-time health benefits of using hearing aids
  • Overall health and wellness tracking through the app’s combined brain and body health score (Thrive Wellness Score)
  • Integration of the physical activity data measured by inertial sensors of the hearing aids with Apple Health and Google Fit apps
  • Personalized Control for customizable adjustments to sound and programs
  • Remote programming by users’ hearing professionals to put hearing healthcare in the hands of the users
  • Natural user interface with tap control
  • Unprecedented, natural listening, and speech clarity in the noisiest environments with the new Hearing Reality technology
  • Integrated language translation
  • Dual-radio wireless platform: 2.4GHz radio for streaming of phone calls, music, media, apps, and connecting with various devices including TVs and Amazon Alexa; near-field magnetic induction technology for true ear-to-ear communication and binaural noise reduction
  • Fall detection with inertial sensors integrated within the hearing aids (App support coming soon)

Ear wax removal Wells Somerset

Designed to help users live their healthiest life, Livio AI is available as a RIC 312 and BTE 13 in a variety of colors. In addition to the above features, Livio AI also includes Starkey’s feedback cancellation, high-definition music prescription, Multiflex Tinnitus Technology, and Surface™ NanoShield pioneering water, wax, and moisture repellant system to help protect and ensure durability and dependability.

How integrated sensors and AI helped Starkey transform the hearing aid

“Artificial intelligence, coupled with advanced sensing devices, is rapidly changing the world around us,” Starkey Hearing Technologies Chief Technology Officer and Executive Vice President of Engineering Achin Bhowmik said. “We are proud to introduce these transformational technologies into the world of hearing aids to both optimize the users’ hearing experiences and enable them to continuously monitor and improve their overall health besides treating hearing loss, reducing the associated risks of dementia, anxiety, and social isolation.”

The integrated 3D motion sensors inside Livio AI enable the hearing aids to detect movement, track activities, and recognize gestures. The hearing aids communicate with each other and compatible mobile accessories to deliver meaningful, real-time feedback about users’ overall body and cognitive health and fitness. Wells, Somerset is the premier place for ear wax removal.

This technology may allow people to take a proactive and personal approach to treating hearing loss, which has been linked to various health issues including dementia, cognitive decline, anxiety, stress, social isolation, and an increased risk of falling.

Livio AI is reportedly the first device utilizing the ears to help users better understand not only how to improve their overall health and wellness, but also the deep connection between treating hearing loss and reducing health risks. This helps to improve key areas of wellbeing by reconnecting users to the people, places, and activities they love.

Livio AI is available in the United States and Canada at this time, with a global rollout to more than 20 countries in 2019. For more information about Livio AI hearing aids, the Thrive mobile app, and new Starkey Hearing Technologies accessories, visit www.starkey.com.

Also see Hearing Review’s follow-up article detailing Starkey’s launch of Livio AI.

Source: Starkey